Author: Lynn Hunt, Genre: History, Total Page: 1205, Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education, ISBN: 9781319171414

With a superior chronological organization, The Making of the West tells the story of the cross-cultural, global exchanges that have shaped western history. This two-color Value Edition includes the unabridged narrative and select maps and images from the comprehensive text. LaunchPad also features all of the contents of the comprehensive edition in full color, including primary source features and summative quizzing in each chapter, numerous supplement options, and a free companion sourcebook. With LaunchPad, the Value Edition is an excellent resource at an outstanding price. Available for free when packaged with the print book, the popular digital assignment and assessment options for this text bring skill building and assessment to a highly effective level. The active learning options come in LaunchPad which combines an accessible e-book with LearningCurve, an adaptive and automatically graded learning tool that—when assigned—helps ensure students read the book; the complete companion reader with comparative questions that help students build arguments from those sources; and many other study and assessment tools. For instructors who want the easiest and most affordable way to ensure students come to class prepared Achieve Read & Practice pairs LearningCurve, adaptive quizzing and our mobile, accessible Value Edition e-book, in one easy-to-use product.

Author: Lynn Hunt, Genre: , Total Page: 1248, Publisher: Bedford Books, ISBN: 1319244513

Author: Katharine J. Lualdi, Genre: History, Total Page: 384, Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education, ISBN: 9781457605505

Sources of The Making of the West provides written and visual documents closely aligned with each chapter of The Making of the West. This two-volume collection reinforces the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the textbook by allowing students to engage directly with the voices of those who experienced them. Over thirty new documents and visual sources highlight the diversity of historical voices — including both notable figures and ordinary individuals — that shaped each period. To aid students in approaching and interpreting documents, each chapter contains an introduction, document headnotes, and questions for discussion.

Author: Anne F. Hyde, Genre: History, Total Page: 464, Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company, ISBN: 9780393634105

A fresh history of the West grounded in the lives of mixed-descent Native families who first bridged and then collided with racial boundaries. Often overlooked, there is mixed blood at the heart of America. And at the heart of Native life for centuries there were complex households using intermarriage to link disparate communities and create protective circles of kin. Beginning in the seventeenth century, Native peoples—Ojibwes, Otoes, Cheyennes, Chinooks, and others—formed new families with young French, English, Canadian, and American fur traders who spent months in smoky winter lodges or at boisterous summer rendezvous. These families built cosmopolitan trade centers from Michilimackinac on the Great Lakes to Bellevue on the Missouri River, Bent’s Fort in the southern Plains, and Fort Vancouver in the Pacific Northwest. Their family names are often imprinted on the landscape, but their voices have long been muted in our histories. Anne F. Hyde’s pathbreaking history restores them in full. Vividly combining the panoramic and the particular, Born of Lakes and Plains follows five mixed-descent families whose lives intertwined major events: imperial battles over the fur trade; the first extensions of American authority west of the Appalachians; the ravages of imported disease; the violence of Indian removal; encroaching American settlement; and, following the Civil War, the disasters of Indian war, reservations policy, and allotment. During the pivotal nineteenth century, mixed-descent people who had once occupied a middle ground became a racial problem drawing hostility from all sides. Their identities were challenged by the pseudo-science of blood quantum—the instrument of allotment policy—and their traditions by the Indian schools established to erase Native ways. As Anne F. Hyde shows, they navigated the hard choices they faced as they had for centuries: by relying on the rich resources of family and kin. Here is an indelible western history with a new human face.

Author: Lynn Avery Hunt, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 629, Publisher: Bedford/st Martins, ISBN: 0312183682

Hailed as a path-breaking contribution and a sensible new choice for the Western Civilization classroom of the 21st century, The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures -- written by a team of notable historians and experienced teachers -- offers a new synthesis, one that reveals history as a process while capturing the spirit of each age.

Author: Lynn Hunt, Genre: History, Total Page: 2011, Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education, ISBN: 9781319103675

With a superior chronological organization, The Making of the West tells the story of the cross-cultural, global exchanges that have shaped western history. The book offers primary sources in each chapter, a full-color map and art program, and comprehensive supplement options, including LaunchPad and a free companion sourcebook. The Making of the West is an excellent value at an outstanding price. Available for free when packaged with the print book, the popular digital assignment and assessment options for this text bring skill building and assessment to a more highly effective level. The greatest active learning options come in LaunchPad, which combines an accessible e-book with LearningCurve, an adaptive and automatically graded learning tool that—when assigned—helps ensure students read the book; the complete companion reader with comparative questions that help students build arguments from those sources; and many other study and assessment tools. For instructors who want the easiest and most affordable way to ensure students come to class prepared Achieve Read & Practice pairs LearningCurve, adaptive quizzing and our mobile, accessible Value Edition e-book, in one easy-to-use product.

Author: Jason E. Pierce, Genre: History, Total Page: 312, Publisher: University Press of Colorado, ISBN: 9781607323969

The West, especially the Intermountain states, ranks among the whitest places in America, but this fact obscures the more complicated history of racial diversity in the region. In Making the White Man’s West, author Jason E. Pierce argues that since the time of the Louisiana Purchase, the American West has been a racially contested space. Using a nuanced theory of historical “whiteness,” he examines why and how Anglo-Americans dominated the region for a 120-year period. In the early nineteenth century, critics like Zebulon Pike and Washington Irving viewed the West as a “dumping ground” for free blacks and Native Americans, a place where they could be segregated from the white communities east of the Mississippi River. But as immigrant populations and industrialization took hold in the East, white Americans began to view the West as a “refuge for real whites.” The West had the most diverse population in the nation with substantial numbers of American Indians, Hispanics, and Asians, but Anglo-Americans could control these mostly disenfranchised peoples and enjoy the privileges of power while celebrating their presence as providing a unique regional character. From this came the belief in a White Man’s West, a place ideally suited for “real” Americans in the face of changing world. The first comprehensive study to examine the construction of white racial identity in the West, Making the White Man’s West shows how these two visions of the West—as a racially diverse holding cell and a white refuge—shaped the history of the region and influenced a variety of contemporary social issues in the West today.

Author: Iain McGilchrist, Genre: Psychology, Total Page: 615, Publisher: Yale University Press, ISBN: 9780300245929

A new edition of the bestselling classic – published with a special introduction to mark its 10th anniversary This pioneering account sets out to understand the structure of the human brain – the place where mind meets matter. Until recently, the left hemisphere of our brain has been seen as the ‘rational’ side, the superior partner to the right. But is this distinction true? Drawing on a vast body of experimental research, Iain McGilchrist argues while our left brain makes for a wonderful servant, it is a very poor master. As he shows, it is the right side which is the more reliable and insightful. Without it, our world would be mechanistic – stripped of depth, colour and value.

Author: Jack Weatherford, Genre: History, Total Page: 354, Publisher: Crown, ISBN: 9780609809648

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The startling true history of how one extraordinary man from a remote corner of the world created an empire that led the world into the modern age—by the author featured in Echoes of the Empire: Beyond Genghis Khan. The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in twenty-five years than the Romans did in four hundred. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization. Vastly more progressive than his European or Asian counterparts, Genghis Khan abolished torture, granted universal religious freedom, and smashed feudal systems of aristocratic privilege. From the story of his rise through the tribal culture to the explosion of civilization that the Mongol Empire unleashed, this brilliant work of revisionist history is nothing less than the epic story of how the modern world was made.

Author: Lynn Hunt, Genre: History, Total Page: 529, Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education, ISBN: 9781457626890

Students of Western civilization need more than facts. They need to understand the cross-cultural, global exchanges that shaped Western history; to be able to draw connections between the social, cultural, political, economic, and intellectual happenings in a given era; and to see the West not as a fixed region, but a living, evolving construct. These needs have long been central to The Making of the West. The book’s chronological narrative emphasizes the wide variety of peoples and cultures that created Western civilization and places them together in a common context, enabling students to witness the unfolding of Western history, understand change over time, and recognize fundamental relationships.