Author: Thomas Thomas E., Genre: History, Total Page: 474, Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA, ISBN: UOM:39015054422335

Author: Thomas E. Skidmore, Genre: History, Total Page: 520, Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA, ISBN: 0199929238

Now thoroughly updated in its eighth edition, Modern Latin America is a lively interpretive history that covers the continent from 1880 to the present, with a preliminary chapter providing context for the region back to 1492. Organized by country/region case studies, rather than chronologically, students are guided through the major countries of Latin America, with central themes including European-New World interaction, racial mixtures, military takeovers, and U.S. intervention in the area.

Author: John Charles Chasteen, Genre: History, Total Page: 364, Publisher: Scholarly Resources Incorporated, ISBN: UOM:39076001508303

Problems in Modern Latin American History: A Reader is the long-awaited successor to Joseph S. Tulchin's Problems in Latin American History, which was published more than twenty years ago and has been out of print for ten. Realizing how the field has changed in the past two decades, Professors Chasteen and Tulchin have compiled a work that addresses new topics and issues to serve both faculty and students alike.p The authors examine nine problems in modern Latin America-issues that complement most survey texts and create geographical and chronological spans maximizing the book's applicability to various classroom needs. Each of the book's nine chapters, compiled by an expert in the field, begins with an introduction that provides an overview of the problem to be examined.p

Author: Lawrence A. Clayton, Genre: History, Total Page: 708, Publisher: Univ of California Press, ISBN: 9780520289024

"Revised and expanded third edition"--Cover.

Author: Diego Armus, Genre: Medical, Total Page: 335, Publisher: Duke University Press, ISBN: 9780822384342

Challenging traditional approaches to medical history, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America advances understandings of disease as a social and cultural construction in Latin America. This innovative collection provides a vivid look at the latest research in the cultural history of medicine through insightful essays about how disease—whether it be cholera or aids, leprosy or mental illness—was experienced and managed in different Latin American countries and regions, at different times from the late nineteenth century to the present. Based on the idea that the meanings of sickness—and health—are contestable and subject to controversy, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America displays the richness of an interdisciplinary approach to social and cultural history. Examining diseases in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia, the contributors explore the production of scientific knowledge, literary metaphors for illness, domestic public health efforts, and initiatives shaped by the agendas of international agencies. They also analyze the connections between ideas of sexuality, disease, nation, and modernity; the instrumental role of certain illnesses in state-building processes; welfare efforts sponsored by the state and led by the medical professions; and the boundaries between individual and state responsibilities regarding sickness and health. Diego Armus’s introduction contextualizes the essays within the history of medicine, the history of public health, and the sociocultural history of disease. Contributors. Diego Armus, Anne-Emanuelle Birn, Kathleen Elaine Bliss, Ann S. Blum, Marilia Coutinho, Marcus Cueto, Patrick Larvie, Gabriela Nouzeilles, Diana Obregón, Nancy Lays Stepan, Ann Zulawski

Author: Nancy P. Appelbaum, Genre: History, Total Page: 352, Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press, ISBN: 9780807862315

This collection brings together innovative historical work on race and national identity in Latin America and the Caribbean and places this scholarship in the context of interdisciplinary and transnational discussions regarding race and nation in the Americas. Moving beyond debates about whether ideologies of racial democracy have actually served to obscure discrimination, the book shows how notions of race and nationhood have varied over time across Latin America's political landscapes. Framing the themes and questions explored in the volume, the editors' introduction also provides an overview of the current state of the interdisciplinary literature on race and nation-state formation. Essays on the postindependence period in Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, and Peru consider how popular and elite racial constructs have developed in relation to one another and to processes of nation building. Contributors also examine how ideas regarding racial and national identities have been gendered and ask how racialized constructions of nationhood have shaped and limited the citizenship rights of subordinated groups. The contributors are Sueann Caulfield, Sarah C. Chambers, Lillian Guerra, Anne S. Macpherson, Aims McGuinness, Gerardo Renique, James Sanders, Alexandra Minna Stern, and Barbara Weinstein.

Author: Teresa A. Meade, Genre: History, Total Page: 408, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 9781118772485

Now available in a fully-revised and updated second edition, A History of Modern Latin America offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the rich cultural and political history of this vibrant region from the onset of independence to the present day. Includes coverage of the recent opening of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba as well as a new chapter exploring economic growth and environmental sustainability Balances accounts of the lives of prominent figures with those of ordinary people from a diverse array of social, racial, and ethnic backgrounds Features first-hand accounts, documents, and excerpts from fiction interspersed throughout the narrative to provide tangible examples of historical ideas Examines gender and its influence on political and economic change and the important role of popular culture, including music, art, sports, and movies, in the formation of Latin American cultural identity Includes all-new study questions and topics for discussion at the end of each chapter, plus comprehensive updates to the suggested readings

Author: John Soluri, Genre: History, Total Page: 310, Publisher: Berghahn Books, ISBN: 9781785333910

Though still a relatively young field, the study of Latin American environmental history is blossoming, as the contributions to this definitive volume demonstrate. Bringing together thirteen leading experts on the region, A Living Past synthesizes a wide range of scholarship to offer new perspectives on environmental change in Latin America and the Spanish Caribbean since the nineteenth century. Each chapter provides insightful, up-to-date syntheses of current scholarship on critical countries and ecosystems (including Brazil, Mexico, the Caribbean, the tropical Andes, and tropical forests) and such cross-cutting themes as agriculture, conservation, mining, ranching, science, and urbanization. Together, these studies provide valuable historical contexts for making sense of contemporary environmental challenges facing the region.

Author: Pablo A. Baisotti, Genre: History, Total Page: 392, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781000458862

This volume explores several notable themes related to foreign affairs in Latin America and the reconfiguration of the power of the different states in the region. It offers insightful historical perspectives for understanding national, regional and global issues from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day, from analysis of the traditional "hegemony" of the United States over Latin America through its military, and political influence due to the presence of the European Union, Russia, and China. These views cannot be reduced to a simplistic vision of the dominant and subordinate; rather, they attempt to seek lines of continuity by highlighting traditional interpretations of new scenarios such as regional trading and security blocs. The volume refuses to impose a traditional and uncritical linear historical narrative onto the reader and instead proposes an alternative interpretation of the past and its relation to the present. Finally, the growing importance of international mechanisms in enabling the success of certain Latin American regimes is also highlighted, in particular the influence of regional diffusion through international organizations or other networks.

Author: Eric Selbin, Genre: Political Science, Total Page: 248, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9780429974595

In contrast to previous studies that have centered on the institutionalization of revolution in Latin America and the Caribbean, Modern Latin American Revolutions, Second Edition, introduces the concept of consolidation of the revolutionary process?the efforts of revolutionary leaders to transform society and the acceptance by a significant majority of the population of the core of the social revolutionary project. As a result, the spotlight is on people, not structures, and transformation, not simply revolutionary transition.The second edition of this acclaimed book has been revised to include new information on the cases of Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Grenada, assessing the extent to which each revolution was both institutionalized and consolidated. This edition also boasts expanded coverage on Chuevara's visionary leadership and an all-new section that addresses the future of revolution in Latin America and the Caribbean. Dr. Selbin argues that there is a strong link between organizational leadership and the institutionalization process on the one hand, and visionary leadership and the consolidation process on the other. Particular attention is given to the ongoing revolutionary process in Nicaragua, with an emphasis on the implications and ramifications of the 1990 electoral process. A final chapter includes brief analyses of the still unfolding revolutionary processes in El Salvador and Peru.