Author: Susan Lobo, Genre: History, Total Page: 542, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781317346166

This unique reader presents a broad approach to the study of American Indians through the voices and viewpoints of the Native Peoples themselves. Multi-disciplinary and hemispheric in approach, it draws on ethnography, biography, journalism, art, and poetry to familiarize students with the historical and present day experiences of native peoples and nations throughout North and South America–all with a focus on themes and issues that are crucial within Indian Country today. For courses in Introduction to American Indians in departments of Native American Studies/American Indian Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, Sociology, History, Women's Studies.

Author: Susan Lobo, Genre: , Total Page: 546, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 1138356883

This unique reader presents a broad approach to the study of American Indians through the voices and viewpoints of the Native Peoples themselves. Multi-disciplinary and hemispheric in approach, it draws on ethnography, biography, journalism, art, and poetry to familiarize students with the historical and present day experiences of native peoples and nations throughout North and South America-all with a focus on themes and issues that are crucial within Indian Country today. For courses in Introduction to American Indians in departments of Native American Studies/American Indian Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, Sociology, History, Women's Studies.

Author: Alison Owings, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 391, Publisher: Rutgers University Press, ISBN: 9780813550961

In Indian Voices, Alison Owings takes readers on a fresh journey across America, east to west, north to south, and around again. Owings's most recent oral history—engagingly written in a style that entertains and informs—documents what Native Americans say about themselves, their daily lives, and the world around them. Young and old from many tribal nations speak with candor, insight, and (unknown to many non-Natives) humor about what it is like to be a Native American in the twenty-first century. Through intimate interviews many also express their thoughts about the sometimes staggeringly ignorant, if often well-meaning, non-Natives they encounter—some who do not realize Native Americans still exist, much less that they speak English, have cell phones, use the Internet, and might attend powwows and power lunches. Indian Voices, an inspiring and important contribution to the literature about the original Americans, will make every reader rethink the past—and present—of the United States.

Author: Lisa Charleyboy, Genre: Young Adult Nonfiction, Total Page: 250, Publisher: Annick Press, ISBN: 9781554516889

A highly-acclaimed anthology about growing up NativeÑnow in paperback. *Best Books of 2014, American Indians in ChildrenÕs Literature *Best Book of 2014, Center for the Study of Multicultural Literature *2015 USBBY Outstanding International Book Honor List A collection truly universal in its themes, Dreaming in Indian will shatter commonly held stereotypes about Native peoples and offers readers a unique insight into a community often misunderstood and misrepresented by the mainstream media. Native artists, including acclaimed author Joseph Boyden, renowned visual artist Bunky Echo Hawk, and stand-up comedian Ryan McMahon, contribute thoughtful and heartfelt pieces on their experiences growing up Native. Whether addressing the effects of residential schools, calling out bullies through personal manifestos, or simply citing their hopes for the future, this book refuses to shy away from difficult topics. Insightful, thought-provoking, brutallyÑand beautifullyÑhonest, this book is sure to appeal to young adults everywhere. ÒNot to be missed.ÓÑSchool Library Journal, *starred review ÒÉa uniquely valuable resource.Ó ÑKirkus Reviews, *starred review ÒÉ wide-ranging and emotionally potent ÉÓÑPublishers Weekly

Author: Mark A Nicholas, Genre: History, Total Page: 208, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781315509358

Integrates Native American perspectives into American history Native Voices is a source reader that covers the entire span of Native American history. It offers documents for readers to evaluate the Native Voice across the American continent and in parts of Latin America. Each document sheds light on Native North America and provides readers with the Native American perspective of their history. The organization of Native Voices and its readings are designed to correlate with First Americans: A History of Native Peoples, MySearchLab is a part of the Nicholas program. Research and writing tools, including access to academic journals, help students understand Native American history in even greater depth.

Author: Ella Elizabeth Clark, Genre: Indians of North America, Total Page: 244, Publisher: Univ of California Press, ISBN: 0520002431

A collection of over one hundred tribal tales drawn from government documents, old periodicals and histories, reports of anthropologists and folklorists, and personal interviews with Indians of Washington and Oregon.

Author: Lisa Charleyboy, Genre: Young Adult Nonfiction, Total Page: 250, Publisher: Annick Press, ISBN: 9781554519590

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

Author: Tommy Orange, Genre: Fiction, Total Page: 256, Publisher: McClelland & Stewart, ISBN: 9780771073021

Here is a voice we have never heard--a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with stunning urgency and force. Here is a story of several people, each of whom has private reasons for travelling to the Big Oakland Powwow. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honour his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil Red Feather, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and has come to the powwow to dance in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and unspeakable loss. Fierce, angry, funny, heartbreaking, There There is a relentlessly paced multi-generational story about violence and recovery, memory and identity, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. An unforgettable debut.

Author: Steven Mintz, Genre: History, Total Page: 266, Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN: 1881089592

An introduction synthesizes the latest anthropological, archaeological, historical, and sociological scholarship and the 95 carefully edited selections provide students with an overview of Native American history from the earliest migrations to the present. The volume includes a chronology, glossary, and bibliography, making it a valuable teaching tool.

Author: Richard A. Grounds, Genre: History, Total Page: 380, Publisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, ISBN: UOM:49015002807403

Native peoples of North America still face an uncertain future due to their unstable political, legal, and economic positions. Views of their predicament continue to be dominated by non-Indian writers. In response, a dozen Native American writers here reclaim their rightful role as influential "voices" in debates about Native communities. These scholars examine crucial issues of politics, law, and religion in the context of ongoing Native American resistance to the dominant culture. They particularly show how the writings of Vine Deloria, Jr., have shaped and challenged American Indian scholarship in these areas since 1960s. They provide key insights into Deloria's thought, while introducing some critical issues confronting Native nations. Collectively, these essays take up four important themes: indigenous societies as the embodiment of cultures of resistance, legal resistance to western oppression against indigenous nations, contemporary Native religious practices, and Native intellectual challenges to academia. Essays address indigenous perspectives on topics usually treated by non-Indians, such as role of women in Indian society, the importance of sacred sites to American Indian religious identity, and relationship of native language to indigenous autonomy. A closing essay by Deloria, in vintage form, reminds Native Americans of their responsibilities and obligations to one another and to past and future generations. This book argues for renewed cultivation of a Native American Studies that is more Indian-centered.