Author: Joyce Oldham Appleby, Genre: Graphic novels, Total Page: 1116, Publisher: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe, ISBN: 0078777135

Author: Colin L. Powell, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 656, Publisher: Ballantine Books, ISBN: 9780307763686

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A great American success story . . . an endearing and well-written book.”—The New York Times Book Review Colin Powell is the embodiment of the American dream. He was born in Harlem to immigrant parents from Jamaica. He knew the rough life of the streets. He overcame a barely average start at school. Then he joined the Army. The rest is history—Vietnam, the Pentagon, Panama, Desert Storm—but a history that until now has been known only on the surface. Here, for the first time, Colin Powell himself tells us how it happened, in a memoir distinguished by a heartfelt love of country and family, warm good humor, and a soldier’s directness. My American Journey is the powerful story of a life well lived and well told. It is also a view from the mountaintop of the political landscape of America. At a time when Americans feel disenchanted with their leaders, General Powell’s passionate views on family, personal responsibility, and, in his own words, “the greatness of America and the opportunities it offers” inspire hope and present a blueprint for the future. An utterly absorbing account, it is history with a vision.

Author: Rinker Buck, Genre: History, Total Page: 464, Publisher: Simon and Schuster, ISBN: 9781451659160

In the bestselling tradition of Bill Bryson and Tony Horwitz, Rinker Buck's The Oregon Trail is a major work of participatory history: an epic account of traveling the 2,000-mile length of the Oregon Trail the old-fashioned way, in a covered wagon with a team of mules—which hasn't been done in a century—that also tells the rich history of the trail, the people who made the migration, and its significance to the country. Spanning 2,000 miles and traversing six states from Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, the Oregon Trail is the route that made America. In the fifteen years before the Civil War, when 400,000 pioneers used it to emigrate West—historians still regard this as the largest land migration of all time—the trail united the coasts, doubled the size of the country, and laid the groundwork for the railroads. The trail years also solidified the American character: our plucky determination in the face of adversity, our impetuous cycle of financial bubbles and busts, the fractious clash of ethnic populations competing for the same jobs and space. Today, amazingly, the trail is all but forgotten. Rinker Buck is no stranger to grand adventures. The New Yorker described his first travel narrative,Flight of Passage, as “a funny, cocky gem of a book,” and with The Oregon Trailhe seeks to bring the most important road in American history back to life. At once a majestic American journey, a significant work of history, and a personal saga reminiscent of bestsellers by Bill Bryson and Cheryl Strayed, the book tells the story of Buck's 2,000-mile expedition across the plains with tremendous humor and heart. He was accompanied by three cantankerous mules, his boisterous brother, Nick, and an “incurably filthy” Jack Russell terrier named Olive Oyl. Along the way, Buck dodges thunderstorms in Nebraska, chases his runaway mules across miles of Wyoming plains, scouts more than five hundred miles of nearly vanished trail on foot, crosses the Rockies, makes desperate fifty-mile forced marches for water, and repairs so many broken wheels and axels that he nearly reinvents the art of wagon travel itself. Apart from charting his own geographical and emotional adventure, Buck introduces readers to the evangelists, shysters, natives, trailblazers, and everyday dreamers who were among the first of the pioneers to make the journey west. With a rare narrative power, a refreshing candor about his own weakness and mistakes, and an extremely attractive obsession for history and travel,The Oregon Trail draws readers into the journey of a lifetime.

Author: Emma Carlson Berne, Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction, Total Page: 24, Publisher: American Journey, ISBN: 1641289007

"In this book, leveled text and vibrant, full-color photographs help readers to understand the journeys that Indian-Americans took to the United States. This title also introduces readers to their country of origin, reasons for leaving their former home, the steps and challenges to becoming a U.S. citizen, and the ways in which they assimilate to life in America while bringing their cultures and traditions."--

Author: Bob Spitz, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 880, Publisher: Penguin, ISBN: 9780525560272

From New York Times bestselling biographer Bob Spitz, a full and rich biography of an epic American life, capturing what made Ronald Reagan both so beloved and so transformational. More than five years in the making, based on hundreds of interviews and access to previously unavailable documents, and infused with irresistible storytelling charm, Bob Spitz's REAGAN stands fair to be the first truly post-partisan biography of our 40th President, and thus a balm for our own bitterly divided times. It is the quintessential American triumph, brought to life with cinematic vividness: a young man is born into poverty and raised in a series of flyspeck towns in the Midwest by a pious mother and a reckless, alcoholic, largely absent father. Severely near-sighted, the boy lives in his own world, a world of the popular books of the day, and finds his first brush with popularity, even fame, as a young lifeguard. Thanks to his first great love, he imagines a way out, and makes the extraordinary leap to go to college, a modest school by national standards, but an audacious presumption in the context of his family's station. From there, the path is only very dimly lit, but it leads him, thanks to his great charm and greater luck, to a solid career as a radio sportscaster, and then, astonishingly, fatefully, to Hollywood. And the rest, as they say, is history. Bob Spitz's REAGAN is an absorbing, richly detailed, even revelatory chronicle of the full arc of Ronald Reagan's epic life - giving full weight to the Hollywood years, his transition to politics and rocky but ultimately successful run as California governor, and ultimately, of course, his iconic presidency, filled with storm and stress but climaxing with his peace talks with the Soviet Union that would serve as his greatest legacy. It is filled with fresh assessments and shrewd judgments, and doesn't flinch from a full reckoning with the man's strengths and limitations. This is no hagiography: Reagan was never a brilliant student, of anything, and his disinterest in hard-nosed political scheming, while admirable, meant that this side of things was left to the other people in his orbit, not least his wife Nancy; sometimes this delegation could lead to chaos, and worse. But what emerges as a powerful signal through all the noise is an honest inherent sweetness, a gentleness of nature and willingness to see the good in people and in this country, that proved to be a tonic for America in his time, and still is in ours. It was famously said that FDR had a first-rate disposition and a second-rate intellect. Perhaps it is no accident that only FDR had as high a public approval rating leaving office as Reagan did, or that in the years since Reagan has been closing in on FDR on rankings of Presidential greatness. Written with love and irony, which in a great biography is arguably the same thing, Bob Spitz's masterpiece will give no comfort to partisans at either extreme; for the rest of us, it is cause for celebration.

Author: Emma Carlson Berne, Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction, Total Page: 24, Publisher: American Journey, ISBN: 1641289066

In this book, leveled text and vibrant, full-color photographs help readers to understand the journeys that Mexican-Americans took to the United States. This title also introduces readers to their country of origin, reasons for leaving their former home, the steps and challenges to becoming a U.S. citizen, and the ways in which they assimilate to life in America while bringing their cultures and traditions.

Author: Richard Reeves, Genre: History, Total Page: 399, Publisher: Touchstone Books, ISBN: 0671470671

Journalist Richard Reeves travels the United States with a character representing Alexis de Tocqueville, who brings his book Democracy in America as a guide. Reeves interviews American like Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart and Alaska disc jockey Buster Richardson, examining the status of our democracyand finding out who Americans perceive themselves to be.

Author: Douglas Fisher, Genre: Education, Total Page: 578, Publisher: , ISBN: 0078673984

Author: Joyce Oldham Appleby, Genre: History, Total Page: 660, Publisher: McGraw-Hill/Glencoe, ISBN: 0078777151

A textbook on United States history for students in grades 6-8, from the first Americans through the Civil War.

Author: Joyce Appleby, Genre: United States, Total Page: 721, Publisher: , ISBN: STANFORD:36105026633722

American history text includes multimedia connections to the Internet, CD-ROM, and videodisc technology. Middle school level.